Time to act together to end corruption

Time to act together to end corruption

Corruption is one of the most serious challenges of our time. Nearly all of us are victims of corruption: whether we are poor and cannot afford to pay a bribe for basic services or taxpayers whose hard-earned money gets misappropriated.

Victims of wars and conflict, voters whose democratic rights are stolen by money politics or factory workers who lose their lives working in unsafe buildings certified by an unscrupulous inspector all suffer from the same scourge.

Nothing feeds corruption more than apathy, or the belief nothing can be done and it is “just the way life is”. This portrayal of corruption allows impunity for corruption to flourish – it allows the corrupt to get away with it.

But not for long. There is compelling and overwhelming evidence that people throughout the world have had enough and are willing to take action to stop corruption.

Two in three people believe that ordinary people can make a difference in the fight against corruption and more than 90 per cent of people would be willing to be engaged in the fight against corruption.

When people act, then change will happen.

Imagine a future where every person in the world takes united action to reject corruption. Transparency International is calling on people everywhere to take simple but profound actions to start an unstoppable global movement to eradicate corruption. This is your pledge:

Corruption – the abuse of entrusted power for private gain – is wrong. It destroys the basic rights of hundreds of millions of people across the world, it has devastating consequences on the services provided by public institutions and it undermines the prospect for a better life for future generations. I believe together we can work towards ending corruption, overcoming widespread injustice and impunity. Therefore I commit, wherever possible, to the Declaration Against Corruption. I will not pay bribes, I will not seek bribes, I will work with others to campaign against corruption, I will speak out against corruption and report on abuse, I will only support candidates for public office who say no to corruption and demonstrate transparency, integrity and accountability. All forms of corruption must be ended to secure the basic rights of all people and ensure a world where everyone can live in dignity. This Declaration Against Corruption is consistent with and supportive of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention against Corruption. It is also consistent with Transparency International’s core values: Transparency, Accountability, Integrity, Solidarity, Courage, Justice, Democracy.

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The Declaration Against Corruption seeks to inspire, nothing more or less than a global wave of people standing up to corruption and demanding dignity for themselves and others.

Be part of the change. We urge people to adopt the declaration, to discuss it with friends and family, in communities, in places of work, in schools, in hospitals, in places of worship. And, most importantly, to act.

What do you think? Are you willing to act? Share your thoughts in the comment section and on Transparency International’s social media accounts and help us spread the word.

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What people think: corruption in the Middle East & North Africa

Momentum has been building against corruption for years in the Middle East and North Africa. From Lebanon and Sudan, where millions of people took to the streets earlier this year to speak out against their governments, to the Arab revolutions that toppled corrupt leaders nearly a decade ago, people are fed up with rampant corruption across the region.

Wasta: How personal connections are denying citizens opportunities and basic services

In many Arab countries the use of personal connections, or “wasta” in Arabic, is a common practice and a social norm. People use their family or social contacts to skip the line and gain quicker and better access to basic goods and services. How much you can increase the speed and quality of your service often depends on who you know – the higher the better, of course.

Sextortion: Middle East and North Africa

Sextortion is one of the most significant forms of gendered corruption and although women’s rights have advanced unevenly across the Middle East and North Africa, positive momentum has been building in the region over the last decade.

Lack of political integrity is undermining trust in democracy in Middle East and North Africa

The Global Corruption Barometer – Middle East and North Africa 2019 reveals that leaders in the region are perceived as acting in their own self-interest at the expense of the citizens they are meant to serve. This has serious consequences for trust in democratic institutions.

آراء المواطنين:  الفساد في منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا

لقد تزايد زخم التنديد بالفساد خلال السنوات الماضية في منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا. وضاق الناس ذرعا بالفساد المستشري في مختلف أنحاء المنطقة، من لبنان والسودان، حيث خرج ملايين الناس إلى الشوارع في مطلع هذا العام للتنديد بصوت عال بممارسات حكوماتهم، إلى الثورات العربية التي أطاحت بالزعماء الفاسدين منذ زهاء عشر سنوات.

الرشوة الجنسية: منطقة الشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا

على الرغم من تفاوت التقدم المُحرز على مستوى حقوق المرأة في مختلف أنحاء الشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا، شهدت المنطقة زخما إيجابيا تنامى تدريجيا خلال العقد الماضي. إذ أصبح عدد أكبر من النساء يُعبّرن عن أنفسهن داعيات إلى تعزيز تمثيل المرأة في الحكومة وتجريم العنف المنزلي وتحقيق المساواة في الحقوق للنساء والفتيات، إلى جانب عدد من المسائل الأخرى التي تهم المرأة. وتُناضل النساء في مختلف دول المنطقة من أجل إعلاء كلمتهن.

حرمان المواطنين من مختلف الفرص والخدمات الأساسية  بسبب استغلال آخرين لعلاقاتهم الشخصية

يُعتبر استغلال العلاقات الشخصية في البلدان العربية، أو ما يُعبّر عنه بالواسطة، مُمارسة منتشرة ومُتعارف عليها اجتماعيا. إذ يستغل مختلف الأشخاص علاقاتهم الأسرية أو الاجتماعية لعدم الوقوف في الصف وللوصول على نحو أسرع وأفضل إلى المدارس أو الجامعات أو المستشفيات أو الوظائف، و"لتعجيل" الإجراءات الإدارية في المؤسسات الحكومية مثل تجديد وثائق الهوية أو شهادات الميلاد. وتعتمد عادة سرعة حصولك على الخدمة وجودتها على الشخص الذي تعرفه؛ فبطبيعة الحال، كلما كان في منصب أعلى كان ذلك أفضل لك.

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