Time to act together to end corruption

Time to act together to end corruption

Corruption is one of the most serious challenges of our time. Nearly all of us are victims of corruption: whether we are poor and cannot afford to pay a bribe for basic services or taxpayers whose hard-earned money gets misappropriated.

Victims of wars and conflict, voters whose democratic rights are stolen by money politics or factory workers who lose their lives working in unsafe buildings certified by an unscrupulous inspector all suffer from the same scourge.

Nothing feeds corruption more than apathy, or the belief nothing can be done and it is “just the way life is”. This portrayal of corruption allows impunity for corruption to flourish – it allows the corrupt to get away with it.

But not for long. There is compelling and overwhelming evidence that people throughout the world have had enough and are willing to take action to stop corruption.

Two in three people believe that ordinary people can make a difference in the fight against corruption and more than 90 per cent of people would be willing to be engaged in the fight against corruption.

When people act, then change will happen.

Imagine a future where every person in the world takes united action to reject corruption. Transparency International is calling on people everywhere to take simple but profound actions to start an unstoppable global movement to eradicate corruption. This is your pledge:

Corruption – the abuse of entrusted power for private gain – is wrong. It destroys the basic rights of hundreds of millions of people across the world, it has devastating consequences on the services provided by public institutions and it undermines the prospect for a better life for future generations. I believe together we can work towards ending corruption, overcoming widespread injustice and impunity. Therefore I commit, wherever possible, to the Declaration Against Corruption. I will not pay bribes, I will not seek bribes, I will work with others to campaign against corruption, I will speak out against corruption and report on abuse, I will only support candidates for public office who say no to corruption and demonstrate transparency, integrity and accountability. All forms of corruption must be ended to secure the basic rights of all people and ensure a world where everyone can live in dignity. This Declaration Against Corruption is consistent with and supportive of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention against Corruption. It is also consistent with Transparency International’s core values: Transparency, Accountability, Integrity, Solidarity, Courage, Justice, Democracy.

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The Declaration Against Corruption seeks to inspire, nothing more or less than a global wave of people standing up to corruption and demanding dignity for themselves and others.

Be part of the change. We urge people to adopt the declaration, to discuss it with friends and family, in communities, in places of work, in schools, in hospitals, in places of worship. And, most importantly, to act.

What do you think? Are you willing to act? Share your thoughts in the comment section and on Transparency International’s social media accounts and help us spread the word.

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