Connecting the dots: building the case for open data to fight corruption

Filed under - Access to information

Report published 23 February 2017
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In 2015 the G20 Anti-Corruption Open Data Principles (hereafter G20 Principles) were developed, as a first step towards leveraging open data as a crucial tool for enabling a culture of transparency and accountability in order to address corruption.

The purpose of this overview report is to make the case for using open data to strengthen anti-corruption efforts. The report, which was jointly conceived and carried out by Transparency International and the Web Foundation, assessed the extent to which a select group of G20 countries (Brazil, France, Germany, Indonesia and South Africa) have met their commitments to fight corruption by applying and implementing the principles and actions set out in the G20 Principles. This report also provides a set of recommendations for further action based on that assessment.

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Country / Territory - International   |   Brazil   |   France   |   Germany   |   Indonesia   |   South Africa   
Region - Global   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Access to information   |   Civil society   |   Politics and government   |   Technology   
Tags - Open data policies   |   Open government   |   Open data   |   G20 Anti-Corruption Open Data Principles   |   Web Foundation   

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