Transparency International staff threatened in Rwanda

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Following a series of recent serious security incidents involving the staff and premises of its chapter in Rwanda, Transparency International, the global anti-corruption movement, is calling on the Rwandan authorities to make every effort in ensuring the safety of its staff.

“The security of our people is paramount for Transparency International. They should be able to pursue their work to tackle corruption and improve people's lives without fear or threats. Unfortunately, this is not the case for Transparency International Rwanda’s staff at the moment,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International.

On 29 July an armed man tried to enter the offices of Transparency International Rwanda by force, this followed separate security breaches at the home of a senior staff member. The Chapter has been in contact with the police regarding these incidents and investigations are ongoing.

Transparency International Rwanda has five offices in Rwanda, all focussed on stopping corruption. It offers advice to people who have suffered from corrupt practices. It runs workshops for both government officials and the media on how to prevent corruption and it publishes research on the levels of corruption in public services in Rwanda.

On the first anniversary of the brutal assassination of Gustave Sharangabo Makonene, staff member of Transparency International Rwanda, the TI Movement is still in mourning.

“As a Movement focused on stopping the scourge of corruption and bringing dignity into people’s daily lives, we strongly believe that it is paramount for those who are responsible for Gustave’s death to face justice” said Akere Muna, Vice-Chair of Transparency International.

Transparency International is calling for the Rwandan authorities to make all possible efforts to protect civil society in the country, and fully investigate all incidents that target Transparency International Rwanda as quickly and thoroughly as possible and guarantee the ongoing security of its staff.


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