Transparency International data shows Ethiopia suffers from high levels of bribery

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International said today that contrary to recent reports, it has not ranked Ethiopia as the least corrupt country in Africa.

Data from the anti-corruption group’s research shows that Ethiopia’s citizens and institutions suffer from high levels of bribery.  

Transparency International’s Global Corruption Barometer 2013, a public opinion survey published in July 2013, showed 44% of respondents in Ethiopia who had come into contact with one of eight public services reported having paid a bribe.

The Global Corruption Barometer does not measure the overall level of corruption in a given country and is not intended as a tool for ranking countries. The survey was carried out in 107 countries and represents the views of over 114,000 people. In Ethiopia, the survey covered a nationally representative sample of 1,000 respondents.

In Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2013, a separate report which measures the perceived levels of corruption in a country’s public sector, Ethiopia was ranked 111 out of 177 countries, with a score of 33 on a scale where 100 means very clean and 0 means highly corrupt.


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