Transparency International warns new presidential powers in Egypt are a threat to democracy

Filed under - Politics and government

Posted 23 November 2012 by Transparency International Secretariat

Translations: AR  

Transparency International, the global anti-corruption organisation, warns that the constitutional declaration by Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi, announced yesterday, concentrates too much power in the executive branch, a move that runs contrary to Egypt’s transition towards democratic reforms.

Transparency International calls on the president to respect the independence of the judicial system necessary for ensuring the rule of law applies to all in Egypt.

The separation of powers between the judiciary, the legislature and the executive branch is the foundation stone of a strong democracy. As described in Transparency International’s 2009 comprehensive national integrity study of Egypt, we emphasise that the independence of the judiciary is a key plank in the fight against corruption and should be protected. The positive steps undertaken during the Arab Spring need to be followed through.

Transparency International calls upon President Morsi to reconsider his position and to maintain the independence of the Egyptian judicial system and the separation of powers that ensure a democratic state has the checks and balances that protect the rights of the people.

Press contact(s):

Farid Farid
Middle East & North Africa Media Coordinator
T: +49 30 34 38 20 666
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Country / Territory - Egypt   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Judiciary   |   Politics and government   

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