Transparency International to join global parliamentarians to make politics more transparent

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Two organisations dedicated to fighting corruption will work together to mobilise parliaments to make the financing of political parties more transparent and pass anti-corruption laws it was announced today.

In a memorandum of understanding signed today by Transparency International Chair Huguette Labelle and the Chair of the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC) Dr. Naser Al Sane, the two organisations agreed to formalize a relationship that will involve sharing information and working together on common goals in specific regions, cementing an informal cooperation dating back several years.

“Parliamentarians by virtue of their role as public leaders and legislators have a unique position as well as the authority to address the corruption challenge,” said Naser Al Sane.

GOPAC, a worldwide alliance of parliamentarians working together to combat corruption, strengthen good government and uphold the rule of law, has 50 Chapters in six continents. Its mission is to identify, motivate, support and inspire parliamentarians to hold governments to account.

Transparency International is a global movement consisting of the International Secretariat, located in Berlin, and more than 100 TI national chapters, aspires to deal with the devastating impact of corruption.

Both organisations lead the global fight against corruption and are active in a number of regional and national anti-corruption bodies such as the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC), a treaty they will work together to promote.

“To ensure successes in the fight against corruption, like-minded membership organisations must work together to realise that it might not otherwise be able to achieve on their own,” said Transparency International Chair Huguette Labelle.

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Transparency International is the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption.


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