Transparency International condemns attack on peaceful demonstrators in Lebanon

Lebanese Transparency Association staffer and another activist taken to hospital after attack by government security forces

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International, the global anti-corruption organisation, today strongly condemned a physical attack by security forces of the Lebanese government on demonstrators, including a staff member of the Lebanese Transparency Association (LTA), Transparency International’s National Chapter.

Ayman Dandash of the LTA, and Zeina Awar from the Lebanese Association for Democratic Elections, were assaulted in front of the Lebanese Parliament building in Beirut on Wednesday while taking part in a peaceful demonstration in support of electoral reforms. Both were taken to the hospital after the attack and later returned home.

Transparency International calls on the government of Lebanon to support freedom of expression and freedom of assembly and to stop its security forces from intimidating peaceful demonstrators.

Transparency International is a non-partisan organisation which works to raise public awareness of the devastating effects of corruption and provides research for policy makers committed to strengthening national integrity systems in the fight against corruption.

Our network of more than 90 National Chapters play an integral role in fighting corruption through advocacy of good governance practices, transparency and integrity at all levels of society.  

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Transparency International is the civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption


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