Transparency International chair Huguette Labelle on fighting corruption in 2012

Filed under - Transparency International

Posted 6 November 2012
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The Transparency International movement gathers annually to discuss the state of corruption globally and develop new strategies to fight corruption.

In a speech delivered today at its Annual Membership Meeting in Brasilia, Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International, outlined the difficult challenges and positive responses the movement experienced this year.

The gathering culminated in the attendance of more than 250 representatives from Transparency International around the world.

 

Press contact(s):

Chris Sanders
Manager, Media and Public Relations
press@transparency.org
+49 30 3438 20 666

Country / Territory - International   |   Brazil   
Region - Global   |   Europe and Central Asia   
Language(s) - English   
Tags - Huguette Labelle   |   Annual Membership Meeting   |   anti-corruption   

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