Slovakia: Cities ranked on their transparency

Filed under - Politics and government

Posted 27 December 2012
lead image

Screen capture of the TI Slovakia open government websiteVisit our Slovak chapter’s Open Local Government ranking website. Compare cities over time, and see how our chapter is working to improve city governance across the country.

Local governments provide many of the services and infrastructure that citizens rely on in their daily lives. When municipal governments are stained by corruption, people suffer.

Two weeks ago Transparency International Slovakia launched its Open Local Government results, an evaluation of 100 largest cities in Slovakia. It is the second time the chapter has assessed the cities across 111 indicators of transparency.

The ranking covers cities that are home to half of the Slovak population. These local governments administer over €3.5 billion each year.

The good news is that 80 out of 100 cities improved in the span of two years, in part an indication of the ranking’s impact and the media pressure it created when first released in 2010.

What’s behind the improvement?

The main reason Slovak cities have improved since the last ranking is the higher quality and amount of information that cities publish on their websites. While in 2010 only a slight majority of cities published minutes from municipal parliament sessions online, this year this information was published by three-fourths of the cities. The number of municipalities publishing tender announcements for public contracts increased similarly.

Meanwhile, the number of cities publishing audio or video recordings of municipal parliamentary sessions has tripled in the past two years – as did the number of cities publishing announcements about allocated grants.

Since the first survey, the quantity of cities requiring codes of ethics for their employees grew from 24 to 36.

How our chapter helps

Transparency International Slovakia has helped push city governments and state-run companies to adopt better, more transparent practices.

One way our chapter helps municipalities improve is through its Transparent Town audit. The chapter identifies gaps and suggests reforms local governments can undertake. The northern Slovak city of Martin offers an example that others can follow. It was given the prestigious UN Public Service Award for its anti-corruption reforms. A year after the start of the project, the first city purchases were carried out by electronic auctions, saving up to quarter of expected expenditures.

The chapter has also ranked Slovakian state-owned companies on their transparency, and set up an open database of public procurement tenders that allows members of the public to see which firms are winning contracts. So far, the database has shown over 30,000 contracts worth more than €22 billion.

Resources

Press contact(s):

Gabriel Šípoš
Transparency International Slovakia
+421 2 5341 72 07
http://www.transparency.sk/
http://www.facebook.com/transparencysk

Chris Sanders
Manager, Media and Public Relations, Transparency International Secretariat
press@transparency.org
+49 30 3438 20 666

Country / Territory - Slovakia   
Language(s) - English   
Topic - Access to information   |   Accountability   |   Governance   |   Politics and government   |   Public procurement   |   Public services   
Tags - Local governance   |   Public contracting   |   local authority   |   Local government   |   E-procurement   |   Transparency International Slovakia   

By leaving a comment, you acknowledge the terms of use for our comments board.

Stay informed

Related news

Tell the G20 to take action against secret company ownership. #unmaskthecorrupt

Find out how we're taking action in our latest campaign to end the secrecy that helps the corrupt hide their wealth.

Defence spending: how to reduce corruption risks

When a defence company lands a contract with a government without competition, there’s a real risk of corruption.

9
Sep
2014

Cambodia’s integrity system remains weak and requires significant improvement

Transparency International Cambodia releases flagship assessment report on ‘Corruption and Cambodia’s Governance System’. The report finds some ...

Related publications

Publication cover image

Real lives, true stories

As many as two in three people worldwide believe that ordinary citizens can make a difference in the fight against corruption. Whether it’s taking ...

Report published – Aug 2014

Publication cover image

Anti-Corruption Kit: 15 ideas for young activists

When it comes to fighting corruption, many young people are already making a big difference to the communities and countries they live in. But for ...

Report published – Aug 2014